27_Jacob's dream

 
 
 
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27_Story planner

Reference 
Genesis 28
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 39
‘Jacob's dream’ (see Printables)

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the Old Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about 'The Old Testament FlashCards' cards one to three

Question:  When you’re tired at the end of a busy day there is nothing better than to rest your head on a nice soft pillow. But just imagine if you didn’t have a pillow. Imagine if the only thing to rest your head on was a cold, hard stone. Do you think you would sleep well with a rock for a pillow? 

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post for more resources from the web

  • A pillow
  • A large stone or small rock
  • A small jar of olive oil
  • ‘I am the God of Abraham...’ speech bubbles (see Printables)
  • ‘If you are with me’ speech bubbles (see Printables)



Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_ Talk about why Jacob poured oil on the stone.
Ask the children why they think Jacob made the stone into a pillar and poured oil on it. Listen to the children’s answers then explain that Jacob wanted to mark the place as special. People who study the Bible think that Jacob made the stone into a pillar so that he would be able to find the place again. Bible scholars also think that Jacob poured oil on the stone to worship God. Many years later Moses poured a special oil on the Tabernacle (the worship tent) to show that it was extremely special to God (Numbers 7:1).

Option 3_Make climbing angel shadows
You will need: Angel and ladder templates (see Printables), sticky tac, sticky tape, chopsticks and a suitable safe light source such as a torch.

1. Print and cut out the angel templates.
2. Print three or four ladder templates.
3. Trim the ladders top and bottom then join them together to make an extra long ladder.
4. Stick the ladder to the wall using sticky tac.
5. Use a small piece of sticky tape to attach the angel templates to the chopsticks. 
6. Create angel shadows by holding the templates in front of torch-beam as it shines on the ladder then move the templates and the torch up and down so that the angel appears to be climbing up and down the ladder. 

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God we think about Jacob. We remember the great lengths he went to to get the blessing meant for his older brother - Father we realise how important your favour was to him; how he longed to have good things  from you. 

Father we think about Jacob a few days later, lying down in the open air and resting his head on the stone. We remember that as he slept you spoke to him clearly in a dream. Father we thank you that you still speak to people today in surprising ways, at times and in places when they are not expecting to hear from you. Father thank you that even when we are resting or sleeping we can be sure that we will not miss out on what you want to do or say to us. 

Father we remember the comforting words You spoke to Jacob. Thank you that you made it clear that Jacob would be blessed in an even greater way than he had hoped. Father we thank you that the promise to Jacob was about us too - that everybody, everywhere would be blessed through Jacob's family. Thank you that today we know that that promise is about Jesus, that through him everybody everywhere can now say ‘Yes’ to your love and forgiveness and become close friends with you.  Amen

With younger children, or during a shorter session you may wish to select just one or two phrases from the reflective prayer.

 

 

 

27_Craft planner

 

A climbing angel

 
 
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You will need:
An angel template (see Printables)
Cereal-box card or equivalent (paper plates could be used instead)
String cut to 1.5 m lengths
A drinking straw
Sticky tape
Glue
Colouring pencils and/or felt-tip pens
Scissors

How to prepare:
Before the session print or photocopy sufficient instructions for one between two or three children. Print off or photocopy sufficient templates for one per child. You may want to cut out the templates for the younger children in your group. Follow the instructions to make a sample climbing angel so the children know what they are making.


How to make a climbing angel:

 
 

1. Colour in and cut out your angel template.
2. Stick the template to the card and cut out your cardboard angel.
3. Cut the drinking straw into 3 cm lengths. 
4. Turn the angel over and use sticky tape to secure two pieces of straw to the tips of the angel's wing. Wrap the sticky tape over the top of the wings to make sure the pieces of straw are held in place.
5. Thread the string through the straws as shown in the picture. Wrap masking tape around the ends of the string.
6. Hook the string over a door handle and gently pull first on one end of the string and then on the other. As you pull with one hand allow the other hand to move up with the string. As you repeat this your angel will climb to the top of the string.

You could stick the paper ladder (see ladder template) to the door to make it look like the angel is climbing the ladder. 

 

 

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1_God makes the world (Blue whales)

 
 
 
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1_Story planner

Reference 
Genesis 1
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 10
 

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the Old Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about 'The Old Testament FlashCards' card one 

Question:  Did you know that the smallest fish in the world is less than one centimetre long? That’s probably smaller than your thumb nail. Such a tiny fish can be found swimming in forest swamps in Indonesia. The largest animal in the world can also be found in water… but this animal needs a deep ocean to swim in. The largest animal is the blue whale. The blue whale can be as long as thirty metres. That’s more than 3,000 times bigger than the smallest fish and if you lined up three buses one behind the other, a blue whale would still be longer. The Bible tells us that God made the whole world. He made the biggest and the smallest creatures.

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post for more resources from the web

  • Gather some leaves, flowers and seeds and arrange them on a tray.
  • Bring in a selection of library books showing a variety of animals and plants or download images from the internet, but be aware of copyright regulations.

 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_ Play a game with sock fish
You will need: At least twenty pairs of socks, hole-reinforcement stickers, masking tape and two buckets or plastic boxes. 

1. Before the session stick a strip of masking tape to the floor.
2. At a distance of approximately two and a half metres from the tape place two buckets. The buckets should be about a metre apart.
3. Divide the socks into two piles; keep the pairs together but make sure they are not attached to one another.
4. Encourage the children to sit in their teams behind the line of tape. Explain that they are in a fish factory making fish! Give a pile of socks to each team. Show the children how to make a pair of socks into a fish shape following the instructions below. Explain that, as fast as they can the children need to make all their pairs of socks into fish. Then, whilst remaining seated they should throw their fish into their bucket. If a fish misses the bucket they must pick it up, sit back down behind the line and try again.

 

How to make sock fish instructions: 

 
 
  1. Take a pair of socks and place one sock on top of the other. 
  2. Holding the socks together turn the ankle part of one sock over until you have made the two socks into a sock bundle.
  3. Wrap a small piece of masking tape around the sock bundle as shown in the picture. The hem of the sock will form the fish's tail.
  4. Place two hole-reinforcement stickers on your sock fish to look like eyes. 

The first team to complete the challenge and successfully throw all their fish into their bucket is the winning team. 

Help the children to reflect on how amazing it is that God made all the different varieties of fish that can be found around the world. You might like to talk briefly about how unlike real fish the sock fish are.

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God we thank you for your wonderful creation. Thank you for all the magnificent creatures that you have made. Thank you for the tiny fish that swim in swamps and the enormous sea creatures that swim in oceans. 

Father, when we think of your creation - trees growing from tiny seeds and galaxies that go on and on and on, we realise that you are far bigger and far greater than we can ever imagine. 

Father God, thank you for making this beautiful earth and filling it with so many wonderful things. Amen  

 

 

1_Craft planner

 

Blue Whales

 
 
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Beware of allergies - make sure it is safe for the children in your group to handle and taste the food used in this activity.

You will need:
Whale templates (see Printables)
Paper plates
Googly eyes
Sheets of white tissue paper or small clear plastic sandwich bags*
Blue metallic ribbon
Scissors
Colouring pencils and/or crayons
Shell crisps or shrimp sweets
Glue sticks

* Do not give plastic bags to young children

 

How to prepare: Print or photocopy enough instructions for one between three or four children. Print or photocopy sufficient templates for one each per child. Make a sample ‘blue whale’ so that the children know what they are making.

 

How to make a Blue Whale:

 
 
 
 

1.     Colour in and cut out your whale template.
2.     Fold along the dashed lines so that the lines are on the inside of the fold. 
3.    Now re-fold all the lines (except line ‘X’) so that the lines are on the outside of the fold. Line ‘X’ must remain on the inside of the fold.
4.    Cut along the two solid lines as shown. 
5.    Slot the pieces of the tail together to make your whale. Colour in the two flaps of the whale’s tail and stick two eyes onto your template as shown in the picture. 
6.       Place a handful of crisps or five or six sweets in the centre of a sheet of tissue paper. Gather the edges of the tissue paper and tie it into a bundle with a short length of metallic ribbon.  
Alternatively place a handful of crisps or five or six sweets in a sandwich bag. Tie the top of the bag with a short length of metallic ribbon. Curl the ends of the ribbon. 
7-8.      Place the tissue paper bundle or the bag in the middle of the whale. The tissue paper or bag should look like the misty air coming out of the whale’s blow hole.

 

 


 

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11_The sky's the limit

 
 
 
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11_Story planner

Reference 
Genesis 11
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 22
‘The tall tower’ see Printables

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the Old Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about 'The Old Testament FlashCards' card one 

Question:  Are there any tall buildings near your home? A tall building with many floors can sometimes be called a skyscraper. The tallest skyscraper in London is The Shard. It is over three hundred metres high and has seventy-two floors. Inside The Shard there are offices, restaurants and even a hotel. The tallest tower in the world however is over eight hundred metres high. It took six years to build and is made of concrete, steel and glass. It has one hundred and sixty-three floors. 

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post for more resources from the web

  • Pictures from the internet of tall buildings (make sure you comply with copyright regulations).
  • Bricks (either house bricks or toy bricks). Children’s French or Spanish phrase books or a few words translated into three or four languages. 

On the Internet you could find translations for words such as ‘brick’, ‘carry’, ‘lift’, ‘hammer’ to demonstrate the communication problems the builders would have faced.


Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_ Play a game about building
You will need: Lots of plastic cups or toy bricks and lively music with the means to play it.

1. Divide your group into two teams.
2. Give an equal number of cups or bricks to each team.
3. Explain to the children that they need to work together to build a tower.
4. Play the music while the children are building.
5. Intermittently stop the music and shout ‘scatter’. When you shout scatter everybody should run to touch the nearest wall. The last person to touch a wall is out.

The teams then continue building. One team will have one less person which will slow down the building of their tower. When everybody is ‘out’ the team with the tallest tower is the winning team. If you only have a few bricks play the music for a short amount of time before shouting ‘scatter’. 

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God we think about the story. We imagine the people working hard to build the tall tower. Father we remember why they chose to start building. We remember that they had selfish thoughts. We remember that  they wanted to be famous and bring glory and attention to themselves. 

Father we think about what the Bible teaches - that you always want what is best for us. We remember that we are precious and loved by you but it is not good for us to try and bring glory to ourselves; it is not good for us to think that we are better than others; it is not good for us to be proud and want to be admired over and over again. 

Father help us to want to do things that bring glory and praise to you. Father, thank you that the Bible teaches that you deserve all the praise and all the glory. Father help us to work along side others to bring glory to you and to always do what is good and right.  Amen

 

 

 

11_Craft planner

 

A cereal tower

 
 
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Beware of allergies - make sure it is safe for the children in your group to handle and taste the food used in this activity.

You will need:
Ice cream cones (either use the type with a flat base or cut off the tip of the cones)
Shreddies or equivalent
Paper plates enough for two per child
Chocolate spread or honey
Dinner knives 


How to prepare:
Before the session wipe the surfaces in your teaching area.


How to make a cereal tower:
1. Make sure all the children have washed their hands before starting this activity.
2. Give each child two paper plates. On one of their plates place a handful of Shreddies and a cone. The children will use their second plate to build on. 
3. Encourage the children to turn their cone upside down and begin to ‘build’ on the base. Demonstrate how to stack the Shreddies, spreading a little honey or chocolate spread between each to strengthen the tower. 
4. If a cereal tower collapses encourage the child to begin again. At the end of the session praise all the children for their work. 

 

 

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3 & 4_Tempting fruit & Paradise lost (Fruit sticks)

 
 
 
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3 & 4_Story planner

Reference 
Genesis 3
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor pages 13 - 14
 

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the Old Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about 'The Old Testament FlashCards' card one 

Question:  Have you ever accidentally spoilt something special? Perhaps you’ve broken a toy, torn a page in a favourite book or accidentally scratched a DVD. Can you remember the sad feeling when you realised what you had done? When Adam and Eve ate the fruit in the garden their friendship with God was spoilt. The wrong thing they had done separated them from God and they could no longer be friends in the way they had once been. Adam and Eve were sad. God was sad. But God had a plan. Disobedience had spoilt His creation but He would put things right. His plan was to send His Son Jesus so that people could be close friends with Him once more. 

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post for more resources from the web

Beware of allergies make sure it is safe for the children in your group to handle the food used in this activity.

  • ‘Sin word’ graphic (see Printables) 
  • A toy snake 
  • ‘Did God really say…?’ speech bubble (see Printables)
  • An apple 
  • ‘Where are you, Adam?’ speech bubble (see Printables)

 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_ Play a game with sock fish
You will need: Snake templates (see Printables) and enough dice for one between three or four children.

1. Before the session print sufficient templates for one between three or four children. Cut out the templates and divide the snakes into eight shapes. Place the shapes in the envelopes - one set in each envelope. 
2. Divide the children into groups of no more than three or four.
3. Give each group a set of snake shapes.
4. Ask the children to keep the head and tail of their snake and place the remaining shapes on the floor in the middle of the room. It doesn’t matter if the shapes get mixed up at this stage.
5. Encourage the children to sit around the room in their groups. Each group needs to be equidistant from the shapes in the middle. Give each group a dice.
6. Explain that the children should take turns throwing their dice then collecting a corresponding shape from the middle of the room.
7. The group needs to place their collected shapes in the correct order between the head and tail of their snake. Each snake should include one of each shape. If a child throws a number that has already been collected the dice should be passed to the next child.
8. The first team to complete their snake is the winning team.

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God, thank you that you did not give up on mankind when Adam and Eve ate the fruit in the garden.

Thank you that all those years ago you had a plan to one day make a way for everybody everywhere to become close friends with you once more.

Father we now know that your plan was to send your Son. Thank you that 2,000 years ago your Son Jesus came to earth. Thank you that because Jesus lived, died and rose again everybody everywhere can now say ‘Yes’ to your love and forgiveness and become close friends with you.  Amen

 

 

 

3 & 4_Craft planner

 

Fruit sticks

 
 
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Beware of allergies - make sure it is safe for the children in your group to handle and taste the food used in this activity.

You will need:
Thin drinking straws
A selection of fruit such as seedless grapes, melon, pineapple (tinned or fresh), strawberries, kiwi, raspberries
Marshmallows
Chocolate sauce for ice cream (optional)
Sprinkles (optional)
Paper plates
Dinner knives

Note: These fruit sticks are intended to be eaten raw, no cooking is required.


How to prepare:
Make a sample ‘fruit stick’ so that the children know what they are making.


How to make a fruit stick:
1. Make sure the work surfaces in your teaching area are clean and ask the children to wash their hands. 
2. Give each child a paper plate and a selection of fruit to prepare. The fruit needs to be cut into chunks approximately 2.5 x 2.5 cm. Raspberries can be left whole and large strawberries should be cut in half.  
3. Give each child a second paper plate and a thin straw. 
4. Allow the children to select five or six pieces of fruit and two marshmallows. 
5. Help the children to slide the fruit onto their straw. If you have time the children could make two or three fruit sticks each.
6. If you are using chocolate sauce – show the children how to drizzle a small amount across their finished fruit sticks. For a finishing touch add a shake of sprinkles! 

 

 

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338_God's Spirit comes (Blow-paint flames)

 
 
 
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338_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 1-2.
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 384

 

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ card one 

Question: Which of these words would you use to describe the sound of a jet plane? Roaring… banging… booming… zooming… whooshing… thundering… screeching… blasting? Did you know that the sound of a jet plane is one of the loudest sounds ever made? Would you use the same words to describe the noise of a rushing wind?

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post for Bible-images from the web.

  • Pictures of a field of wheat from a library book or the internet (beware of copyright regulations)
  • Tongues of fire (see Printables)
  • Holy Spirit arrow (see Printables)
  • ‘Whatever can have happened to them?’ speech bubble (see Printables)

Clarify that the flame shapes in the story were safe; they were not hot and didn’t hurt anybody.  Remind the children that they must not play near fires and never touch matches or lit candles.

 
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_In the bag
You will need: A bag that the children cannot see through, post-it notes, a French-English dictionary, a towel or tablecloth and four or five small items such as a pen, a cup, a phone, a hat and a sock.

1. Write the names of the items in French on the post-it notes and stick them to the relevant items.
2. Place the items on the floor or table in front of the children. Tell the children what the items are called in French.
3. Ask the children to repeat the French names back to you.
4. Cover the items with the towel then place one item in the bag. Keep the bag under the towel while you place the item in it.
5. Remove the towel and ask the children to tell you in French the name of the item in your bag. Help the children by saying the first letter of the word if they are struggling to remember it. 

Option 3_If you would prefer, put together a PowerPoint presentation – paste a selection of pictures on to a slide with the French name for the items alongside. On the second slide paste all the same pictures except for one. The children need to tell you in French which item is missing. Beware of copyright regulations when using pictures from the internet. 

Option 4_Invite somebody from your congregation to speak about a time when they felt guided and/or helped by the Holy Spirit. Make sure the arrangements for inviting a guest to your setting complies with your church’s policies and procedures. 

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God we picture the disciples praying and praying as they waited for your Holy Spirit to come. We imagine the tremendous noise, like a rushing wind, as your Spirit arrived.

Father God, we thank you for your wonderful Holy Spirit. Thank you that your Holy Spirit comforts, teaches and guides. 

Father we thank you that the Holy Spirit changes us from the inside out. We thank you that, with the powerful help of the Holy Spirit, people all over the world are learning and growing to live the way you created them to live - to be more like Jesus, more peaceful, patient and kind.  Amen 

 

338_Craft planner

 

Blow-paint flames

 
 
flames photo.png
 
 

You will need:
A flame-shape template (see Printables)
Red, yellow and orange washable poster paints
Aprons, newspaper and a floor covering
Drinking straws
Teaspoons
Small dishes to mix paint in
A small jug of water
Glitter and newspaper (optional)

 

How to make blow-paint flames:

1. Print or photocopy sufficient templates for one per child.
2. Put some paint into the dishes, keeping the colours separate. Add a tiny amount of water to each dish to make the  paint slightly runnier.
3. Make sure the children are wearing aprons and the floor and tables are protected. 
4. Encourage the children to put small blobs of paint onto their flame shape using a teaspoon.
5. Show the children how to place the end of their straw close to the paint and blow to make a spiky paint shape. Make sure the children know to blow, not suck.
6. After a while introduce different paint colours until the flame is covered in red, yellow and orange spiky shapes.
7. Place the flame shape on a piece of folded newspaper. Sprinkle the shape with glitter. Tip the excess glitter onto the newspaper. You should be able to carefully transfer the excess glitter from the folded newspaper back into a container.
8. Leave the flames somewhere to dry. If there is time, create some more flames.
9.  When the flames are dry display them on a board or propose they are temporarily placed around the church building as a reminder of the Day of Pentecost.


 

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338_God's Spirit comes (Pentecost Streamers)

 
 
 
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338_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 1-2.
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 384
‘The Day of Pentecost’ (see Printables)

 

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ card one 

Question:  Can you work out how many days there are in seven weeks? Is your answer forty-nine?

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post for more resources from the web

  • A calendar
  • Pentecost/Pentekostos sign (see Printables)
  • ‘Three in One’ symbol (see Printables)
  • Dividing flame shapes (see Printables)
  • A children’s French/English dictionary or alternative

Clarify that the flame shapes in the story were safe; they were not hot and didn’t hurt anybody.  Remind the children that they must not play near fires and never touch matches or lit candles.

 
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_ Make an upper room with darting flames
You will need: A cardboard box, toy figures, small flame shapes (see Printables), drinking straws, sticky tape, colouring pencils, scissors, a tea towel and cotton thread.

1. Colour in and cut out the small flames. Cut the cotton thread into 25 cm lengths. Use the sticky tape to stick flames to both ends of the cotton thread. Wrap the central part of the thread around a drinking     straw so that the flames hang down and move about freely.

 
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2.  Make an ‘upper-room’ by placing the cardboard box on its side and arranging a folded tea towel on the     ‘floor’. Stand the figures on the tea towel. Pass the straws through the holes in the side of the box so the flames are hanging down inside the room. Encourage the children to make the flames dart around     and rest on the figures.

 
dancing flames 2.png
 

Tell the story using the toy figures. At the appropriate point make the flames dart around encouraging the children to add their own sound effects.

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God, we imagine the noise of the wind rushing through the house where the disciples were praying. We picture the flame-shapes darting across the room and heading for each of the disciples. Father we imagine the disciples' joy as they realised the gift they had been waiting for had arrived.

Father God, we thank You that when Jesus went up, the Holy Spirit came down. Father thank You that You did not leave the disciples on their own but sent Your Spirit to be with them in a powerful and amazing way. 

Thank you that in the same way Your Holy Spirit was with the disciples He can be with us today. Thank You that just as the disciples received the Spirit’s gifts and were changed from the inside out we too can be changed by the power of the Holy Spirit as we learn and grow to live the way You created us to live.  Amen.

 

 

338_Craft planner

 

Pentecost streamers

 
 
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You will need:
Orange, red and yellow crêpe paper
‘How to make Pentecost streamers’ instructions (see Printables)
String cut into 30cm lengths – enough for one length per child
Sticky tape
Scissors

 

How to prepare:
Make a Pentecost Streamer to show the children what they are about to make. 
NB. It may be easier if the children worked in pairs to make their streamers

 

How to make Pentecost streamers:

 
 
 
 

1. Cut the crêpe paper into strips approximately 4.5 cm in width and 2 m in length. Roll up the strips to make them easier for the children to handle.
2. Choose two different coloured strips (e.g. orange and yellow) and place them at right angles to each other as shown in the picture. Use two small pieces of sticky tape to secure the strips together in this position. 
3. Pass the orange strip from the right to the left as shown in the picture. 
4. Pass the yellow strip from the top to the bottom as shown in the picture. 
5. Pass the orange strip from the left to the right as shown in the picture.
6. Pass the yellow strip from the bottom to the top as shown in the picture.
7. Repeat steps four to seven until you reach the end of the paper strips. Secure the end pieces together with two pieces of sticky tape. 
8. Open out your Pentecost streamer and stick a piece of string to the end.
10. Hang the streamers up around your teaching space or stick a piece of string to the end of the streamers so that the children can whirl them around. 

 


 

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339_Jesus is Lord (Tear ‘n’ share bread)

 
 
 
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339_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 2
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 384
‘The believers share everything’ see Printables

Notes 
As you talk about God's plan you could show the illustrations on pages 281, 376, 379 and 385 of The Children's Bible in 365 Stories.  When talking about the believers ‘breaking bread’ you may find it helpful to briefly talk about the celebration of Communion using language familiar to the children in your setting. 

 

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one and two

Question:   Do you have a library near where you live? Some big cities have enormous libraries, while a small village might not have a library at all – instead a van full of books stops at the village once or twice a month. But did you know that some places have toy libraries? How do you think a toy library might work?  Whom do the toys belong to?

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A library book or DVD
  • Early church calendar (see Printables)
  • ‘Four things’ text boxes (see Printables)
  • A small bag of coins

 

 
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_An activity about sharing
Beware of allergies – make sure it is safe for the children in your group to handle or taste the food used in this activity.
 

You will need: A large bag of sweets, a dice, small envelopes, a pen, two bowls and a teaspoon.

1. Tell the story using the props listed above then play a sharing game.  
2.  Ask the children to sit in a circle.
3. Empty the bag of sweets into one of the bowls. Place the bowl of sweets and the empty bowl in the middle of the circle.
4. Encourage the children to take turns throwing the dice. If a child throws an odd number ask them to use the teaspoon to place one sweet in the empty bowl, if they throw an even number they should place two sweets in the bowl, if they throw a six they should place three sweets in the bowl.
5. Keep passing the dice around and adding sweets to the bowl until all the children have had one or two goes.  
6. Ask the children if they can remember how many sweets they personally added to the bowl. Ask the children how they think the sweets should be divided among the children present. Remind the children that the new believers shared everything.
7. Write the children’s names on the envelopes and divide the sweets equally between them. If you don’t have enough sweets in the bowl for everyone to have the same amount add some extra sweets. Put the envelopes containing the sweets to one side until the end of the session.

 

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  

Father God, we think about the early Christians meeting together. We think about the wonderful way they shared their belongings and gave their money to those who needed it most. 

Father we remember that as the believers longed to live Your way, the Holy Spirit worked in each one of them, guiding and changing them from the inside out to be more peaceful, patient and kind. 

Father thank You that the gift of the Holy Spirit wasn't just for the disciples in Bible times, but we too can be filled with Your Holy Spirit. Thank You that the Holy Spirit can work in our lives, changing us from the inside out to be more peaceful, patient and kind. Father we ask that in the same way the Holy Spirit was with the early Christians He is with us too, guiding us and changing us to be more like Jesus, and helping us to live the way You created us to live.  Amen. 

With younger children, or during a shorter session you may wish to select just one or two phrases from the reflective prayer.

 

 

339_Craft planner

 

Tear 'n' share bread

 
 
IMG_20170226_142121391.jpg
 
 

Beware of allergies – make sure it is safe for the children in your group to handle and taste the food used in this activity

You will need:
2 x white part-baked French baguettes (approx. 25 cm in length)
A round cake tin (approx. 20cm in diameter)
4oz of cheese        
Optional – a pinch of dried mixed herbs
Butter or low fat spread
A plate
Dinner knives        
Cheese grater
A plate
Chopping board

 

How to prepare:
Before the session cook the part-baked French baguettes. Wipe the surfaces in your teaching area and place the ingredients and utensils somewhere accessible.


How to make tear 'n'share bread:
1. Encourage your group to wash their hands thoroughly.
2. Grease the sides of the cake tin.
2. Place the bread on the chopping board and help the children to use the dinner knives to carefully cut the baguettes into pieces approximately 3 cm in length.
3. Spread a little butter or low fat spread onto one end of each of the pieces.
4. Place the pieces of bread in the cake tin with their buttered ends facing downwards. Squeeze the pieces into the tin so that there are no large gaps and the pieces are unable to move.
4. If you are using dried herbs encourage the children to sprinkle a small amount onto the bread. 
6. Grate the cheese onto a plate. Allow the children to sprinkle the cheese over the surface of the bread.
7. Bake the bread at gas mark 6 (210 degrees) for 15–20 minutes or until the cheese is golden-brown.
8. Cook following the instructions below.

An adult will need to cook the bread
Bake the bread at 210°C/gas mark 6 for about 15–20 minutes or until the cheese is golden-brown and cooked through.  

BEWARE the bread will be very hot when first removed from the oven. Make sure it has cooled before giving it to the children.

If it is appropriate for your setting, serve the tear and share bread to the children and adults after the session. Encourage people to tear off a portion of bread from the edge. 

For a dairy free alternative tear and share bread (see below).

 
 

An alternative pizza dough tear 'n' share bread

 
IMG_20170301_100735183.jpg
 
 

Beware of allergies – make sure it is safe for the children in your group to handle or taste the food used in this activity.

You will need: 
Two packets of pizza dough mix  (gluten/dairy-free products available)
Plain flour
A jug of water
Tablespoon
Mixing bowls
An 18 inch sandwich tin
A small amount of olive oil and a pastry brush

 

How to prepare:
Wipe the surfaces in your teaching area and place the ingredients and utensils somewhere accessible.

 

How to make pizza dough tear 'n' share bread:
1. Encourage your group to wash their hands thoroughly.
2. Lightly grease the sandwich tin.
3. Follow the instructions on the packet of the pizza base mix.
4. Knead the dough well then divide it into small portions.
5. Roll each portion into a small ball about the size of a large marble. 
6.  Place the dough balls in the greased tin so that they are touching each other. Press them down very gently so that there are no large gaps between the balls.
7. Cook following the instructions below. 
    

An adult will need to cook the bread
Bake the bread at 220°C/425°F/gas 7 for about 15–20 minutes or until golden-brown and cooked through.  

BEWARE the bread will be very hot when first removed from the oven. Make sure it has cooled before giving it to the children.

If it is appropriate for your setting, serve the tear and share bread to the children and adults after the session. Encourage people to tear off a portion of bread – you might like to serve it with a little olive oil for dipping. 


 

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339_Jesus is Lord (‘Jesus is Lord’ wooden-mobile)

 
 
 
30 mins.png
 

339_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 2
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 384

Notes 
As you talk about God's plan you could show the illustrations on pages 281, 376, 379 and 385 of The Children's Bible in 365 Stories. 

 

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one and two

Question:   What are you planning to do this afternoon? Can you think of things that need to be planned? How about a party? Or a holiday? Or how about planning what to do when a friend comes to stay? 

Did you know that right at the beginning of time God made a plan? God has had a plan ever since Adam and Eve disobeyed him in the garden. His plan was to make a way for people to become close friends with him again. All the way through time God’s plan has been unfolding: he sent his Son to the earth (this was all part of God’s wonderful plan); Jesus died on the cross (still part of God’s plan); God raised Jesus back to life (all part of God’s plan); Jesus went up to Heaven (still part of God’s plan); the Holy Spirit came down (all part of God’s big plan). 

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • The Holy Spirit arrow (see Printables)
  • ‘Jesus came to make a way’ infographic  (see Printables)
  • ‘God has given us his Spirit’ speech bubble (see Printables)
  • ‘Sin’ infographic  (see Printables)
  • “Saying ‘Yes’ to God's love and forgiveness” infographic (see Printables) 

 

 
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_ Help the children to imagine how big a crowd of 3,000  would be.
You will need: ‘3,000 people’ (see Printables), pens and a calculator.

 
 

Before the session print off three or four copies of the ‘3,000 people’ on a page.  Find out how many pupils attend the local schools and how many people attend your church. 

1. Show the children a copy of the ‘3,000 people’ print out. On the paper draw a circle around the approximate number of people that attend the local school.
2. On another copy draw around the approximate number of people that attend your church.
3. If the children in your group are interested in sport, find out how many people the nearest stadium seats; photocopy or print off a sufficient number of pages of ‘3,000 people’ to represent how many could attend an event held at the stadium. 

Option 3_ For older children ask the following questions and help them work out the answers:
1. If there are 52 seats on one coach, how many coaches would you need to take 3,000 people on a journey? (Answer: you would need 57 coaches to take a crowd of 3,000 people on a journey)
2. If Peter had spoken to one person a day from the crowd of 3,000 – how many years would it take him to speak to everyone? (Answer: just over 8 years) 

 

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father we think about the day your Holy Spirit came to be with people in a new way. We picture the crowd pushing forwards to see the disciples. We imagine Peter standing up and then the silence as the onlookers strained to hear what he said. We remember Peter’s words: ‘God has given us his Spirit’.

Father we thank you that because Jesus lived, died and rose again everybody everywhere can now say ‘Yes’ to your love and forgiveness and become close friends with you. We thank you that when Jesus went up you did not leave the disciples on their own, but sent your Spirit to be with them in a powerful and amazing way. 

Father we thank you that the Holy Spirit is with us today comforting, teaching and guiding us. Thank you that just as the disciples received the Spirit’s gifts and were changed from the inside out, we too can be changed by the power of your Holy Spirit. With the powerful help of the Holy Spirit we too can learn and grow to live your way, the way you created us to live.  Amen. 

With younger children, or during a shorter session you may wish to select just one or two phrases from the reflective prayer.

 

 

339_Craft planner

 

‘Jesus is Lord’ wooden-mobile

 
 
IMG_20180307_111402375.jpg
 
 

You will need:
Large craft lollipop sticks, enough for two per child
Small craft lollipop sticks, enough for two per child
Wooden beads (plastic beads or straws cut into 1cm lengths would     also be suitable)
PVA glue, pots and brushes
‘Jesus is Lord’ textboxes (see Printables)
Colouring pencils and/or felt-tips
String or wool cut into 50 cm lengths (make sure the string can easily be threaded through the beads)
Scissors
Clothes pegs
Sticky tape

 

How to prepare:
Print off or photocopy sufficient templates for one per child. Make a sample mobile so that the children know what they are making.

 

How to make a ‘Jesus is Lord’ wooden-mobile:

 
 
 
 

1.Tie a knot in your string about 5 cm from one end. Take the end without the knot and thread three or four beads onto the string. The beads will stop at the knot.
2. Apply plenty of glue to two small lollipop sticks – only put glue on one side of each stick. Just above the beads sandwich the string between the two small lollipop sticks and press them firmly together. Hold the sticks together until the glue begins to dry, then clamp the sticks together with two clothes pegs.
3. Thread three or four more beads onto the string. The beads will stop at the lollipop sticks.
4. Apply plenty of glue to two large lollipop sticks – only put glue on one side of each stick. Just above the second set of beads sandwich the string between the two small lollipop sticks and press them firmly together.
5.  Hold the sticks together until  the glue begins to dry, then clamp the sticks together with two clothes pegs. 
6. Thread three or four more beads onto the string. The beads will stop at the lollipop sticks. 
7. While the glue is drying colour in and cut out your textboxes.
8. If the glue still has not dried wrap two pieces of sticky tape around the lollipop sticks as shown in the picture. 
9. Carefully stick the textboxes to the lollipop sticks. If you have time colour in a second set of textboxes and stick them to the other side of the lollipop sticks. Tie a  knot in the top of your string so that you can hang up your mobile.

 


 

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343_The African Official

 
 
 
30 mins.png
 

343_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 8
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 389
‘Philip and the Ethiopian Treasurer’ (see Printables)

 

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one to three

Question:   How much money do you think kings and queens have? Perhaps enough to fill a big treasure chest. More? Enough to fill fifty treasure chests? 

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A jar of coins, a crown 
  • A picture of a chariot
  • A map of the Holy Land at the time of Jesus with Jerusalem marked 
  • A scroll – a rolled up piece of paper 
  • A bowl of water

 

 
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_ A cardboard chariot race
You will need: A timer, a cardboard box, scissors, a strong strip of fabric at least three meters in length, ‘story textboxes’ (see Printables), sticky tape and 6  two litre bottles filled with water.

Before the session print and cut out the 'story textboxes'. Stick one to each bottle. Make the box into a chariot by cutting two holes in the front then threading the strip of fabric through to make reins. Use the bottles to make an assault course, placing them around the room but leaving enough space for the chariot to weave in and out. 

Explain that you will need two volunteers; one child will be ‘the horse’, the other the ‘chariot owner’ who will run behind the chariot. The horse needs to pull the chariot from ‘Jerusalem’ (one side of the room) to ‘Gaza’ (the other side of the room) but they need to weave around the assault course. As they pass a bottle the chariot owner needs to pick it up and put it into the ‘chariot’. When the chariot reaches ‘Gaza’ the children will need to read the story textboxes and put the bottles in the right order. If you have a lot of children introduce a second ‘horse’. Time each group completing the task and encourage them to try and beat each others’ times.

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God, we imagine the Ethiopian Treasurer travelling along the road in his fine chariot. We think of him pouring over the Scriptures trying to make sense of what he reads. Thank You that on that day the Holy Spirit worked through Philip to explain what the passage meant. 

Father we remember that reading the Scriptures is an important part of finding out about You, discovering more about Your great love and learning how You want us to live. Father we know that understanding some parts of the Bible can be difficult. Father we ask that when we struggle with complicated passages You help us to understand their meaning. Please show us how our lives can be changed as we learn and grow to live the way the Bible teaches us to live.  Amen  

With younger children, or during a shorter session you may wish to select just one or two phrases from the reflective prayer.

 

 

343_Craft planner

 

Paper cup chariots

 
 
IMG_20170227_102923234.jpg
 
 

You will need:
‘Chariot wheels’ template (see Printables)
Paper cups, enough for one per child
    (plastic cups will work OK if you can't find paper ones)
Split pins, enough for two per child
Wool or string cut into 35cm lengths
Scissors
A pencil and a blob of sticky tac
Colouring pencils or felt-tip pens
Large lollipop sticks
    (small will work OK if you can't find large)
Elastic bands
Scraps of fabric measuring 7 x 6 cm and 2 x 9 cm
Two or three wind-up walking toys of any type*

*These are not intended for the children to take home but are necessary for the chariot race.

How to prepare:
Print or photocopy sufficient ‘chariot wheel’ templates. For younger children you might want to cut out the wheels in advance. Construct an example chariot so the children can see what they are about to make. 

 

How to make a paper cup chariot:

 
 
 
 

 


1. Cut a section out of your cup to make it chariot-shaped.
2. Cut out two chariot wheels, colour them in and cut a hole in the centre of each. To cut a hole in the centre fold the wheels in half and cut a semi-circle in the middle of the fold.
3. Work out where the wheels need to be on your chariot. The wheels do not turn round so they will need to be positioned above the base of the cup. Hold the wheels in position and draw a mark through the hole in each wheel. To make the hole, place a blob of sticky tac inside the cup directly behind the     marks you have just made. Ask an adult to make a hole, using your mark as a     guide, by pushing the tip of a pencil through the cup into the blob of sticky tac behind.  
4. Attach the wheels to your chariot with the split pins. 
5.  Loop the ends of the string around the wheels to make reigns for pulling the chariot along.   
6. Wrap a 7 x 6 cm piece of fabric around a lollipop stick and secure it in place with     an elastic bands. Repeat this with a second lollipop stick.
7.  Draw a face and some feet on both lollipop sticks. Wrap the 2 x 9 cm pieces of     fabric around the ‘shoulders’ of each lollipop person. Tuck the ends of the fabric     into the elastic bands. 
8. Place the lollipop people in the chariot and hook the string around the wind-up toy. Watch as your chariot is pulled along.  
9. When everybody has made a chariot you are now ready to hold a chariot race. If you have two wind-up toys, two chariots can race, if you have three wind-up toys three can race. The children may find it easier to remove their lollipop people from their chariots during the race.
10.Decide with the children where the ‘start’ and ‘finish’ of the race will be. Attach the first chariots to the wind-up toys as shown in the instructions. Encourage the children to wind up the toys and hold them at the ‘start’. When you shout 'go' the children should release the toys and watch as their chariots are pulled to the ‘finish’. The first chariot to reach the ‘finish’ is the winner. Allow the next round of chariots to compete. Encourage the winners of each round to compete against each other. If it becomes obvious that one toy is faster than the other hold the toys behind your back and let the children choose by selecting either your right or left hand.

 


 

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344_Journey to Damascus (Sparkly Battery-candle holder)

 
 
 
30 mins.png
 

344_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 9
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 390
 ‘Saul and the letters’ see Printables.

 

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one to four

Question:  Have you ever stepped outside on a sunny day and squinted at the bright sunlight? Now imagine if that light was so bright that it became impossible to see anything. 

Hundreds of years ago, as a man walked towards the city of Damascus, a bright light flashed around him. The man fell to the ground stunned…

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A map of the Holy Land at the time of Jesus with Jerusalem and Damascus clearly marked
  • The High Priest's letter (see Printables)
  • An envelope with ‘The Leader of the Synagogue, Damascus’ written on it
  • A torch

 

Notes
Briefly explain who the Pharisees were – there is a good explanation on page 306 of The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories.

 
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_ Discover where Paul's letters are in the  Bible
You will need: Masking tape and about 20 envelopes, used ones will be fine.

1. Stick two strips of masking tape to the floor about three metres apart – these will be your ‘start’ and ‘finish’ lines.
2.  Divide your group into two teams and divide the envelopes between them.
3. Explain to the children that the ‘start line’ represents the city of Jerusalem and the ‘finish line’ represents Damascus. The aim of the game is for the teams to get all their letters from ‘Jerusalem’ to ‘Damascus’, then back again. However, the children can only transport the letters by pretending to be donkeys.
4. Encourage each team to nominate one member to be the first donkey and to place an envelope on the donkey's back.
5. The donkey must now walk on all fours from ‘Jerusalem’ to ‘Damascus’. If a letter falls off their back a team member can replace it.
6. When the donkey arrives in Damascus they should tip the letter onto the floor.
7. The next donkey can now set off – however this donkey should carry two letters instead of one.
8. When the second donkey's mail has been delivered the next donkey can set off, this time with three letters and so on.
9.The last donkey in each team should set off for Damascus without any letters.
9. When the  last donkeys arrive all the letters should be placed on their backs and they should slowly return to Jerusalem. The other team members can walk alongside replacing any letters that fall off.
10. The first team to arrive back in Jerusalem with all their letters is the winning team.

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God we imagine Saul setting off for Damascus, carrying the letter for the Leader of the Synagogue. Father we understand that although you did not like the mean and unkind things Saul did, you always loved him and had wonderful plans for his life.  Father God, we thank you that you love each of us us more than we can imagine. We thank you that there is nothing we can do that will make you love us more and there is nothing we can do that will make you love us less. 

Father we think about the bright light that flashed around on the road to Damascus. We remember that Jesus called Saul’s name as he lay on the floor. Father we thank you that you spoke to Saul in a great and powerful way that day. Father we thank you that you still speak to people today. Thank you that you speak in many different ways. Father please help us to listen carefully as you teach, guide and show us how to live your way, the way you created us to live. Amen.

With younger children, or during a shorter session you may wish to select just one or two phrases from the reflective prayer.

 

 

344_Craft planner

 

Sparkly battery-candle holder

 
 
IMG_20180319_115722231.jpg
 
 

Beware of allergies – make sure it is safe for the children in your group to handle the ingredients used in these activities.

You will need:
Glitter of various colours
PVA glue, brushes and pots or an ice cube tray
Craft lollipop sticks
Shop-bought clay or homemade air drying clay (see Printables)
Rolling-pins
Paper plates
Battery tea light 

How to prepare:
Before the session make a sample sparkly battery- holder so that the children know what they are making.

 

How to make sparkly battery-candle holder:

 
 
 
 

1. Mould the clay into the shape of a large pebble or roll it until it is flat, but remains at least an inch thick. 
2.    If you are using a battery tea light press the base of the tea light into the clay then remove it.  An impression should be left large enough for a tea light to fit in once the clay has dried.
3.     Score a pattern into the clay using a craft lollipop stick. The impressions need to be shallow, but at least a couple of millimetres wide.  Mix the glitter into the PVA glue. Carefully fill the impressions in the clay with the glitter glue. 
4.    Leave your clay somewhere safe to dry.

N.B.
Models made with air drying clay will take two to seven days to dry.

Remind the children that light flashed around Saul on the road to Damascus.

 


 

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344 - Journey to Damascus (Shiny Bunting)

 
 
 
30 mins.png
 

344 - Story planner

Reference 
Acts 9
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 390
 

 

Setting the scene and a starter question 3 mins
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one to four

Question:  Did you know that millions of letters are posted  every day? All around the country thousands of men and women work hard, not just to deliver letters, but to sort them too. Overnight many letters are taken to sorting offices where they are organised into bundles. The next morning the letters are pushed through the letterboxes of houses, schools, offices and shops.

 

Tell the story with props - 4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A map of the Holy Land at the time of Jesus with Jerusalem and Damascus clearly marked
  • The High Priest's letter (see Printables)
  • A torch 
  • Names of Paul’s letters (see Printables)
  • Envelopes (before the session stick on the names of Paul’s letters) 

 

 
 

Story Activity -  6 mins
Option 1 -  Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2 -  Discover where Paul's letters are in the  Bible
You will need enough Bibles for one each or one between two or three children, pens and ‘page number’ slips (see Printables).

Before the session place the ‘page number’ slips in the envelopes with the names of Paul’s letters written on.

1. Tell the story using the props.
2. Ask the children to work in twos or threes to find Paul’s letters in a Bible.
3. Hand out the envelopes containing the slips.
4. Ask the children to write the correct page numbers for the corresponding books on the slips i.e. if ‘Romans’ begins on page 1128 and finishes on page 1143 write p1128–p1143 on the slip of paper and place it in the ‘Romans’ envelope.

Option 3  Follow the directions
You will need two chairs and a blindfold. Ask for a volunteer. Explain that the volunteer will be wearing a blindfold. Place two chairs at one end of your teaching space, about a meter apart. Tell the children that the chairs represent the gateway into the city of Damascus. Explain that the blindfolded volunteer needs to walk from one end of the room towards the chairs at the other. They then need to manoeuvre through the ‘gateway’ without touching either chair. To help the volunteer one or two of the other children could shout directions. Make sure the volunteer understands what they have to do before they are blindfolded.

 

Reflective prayer - 2 mins  
Father we think of Saul leaving Jerusalem an angry man but arriving in Damascus ready to be changed. Father we remember that when Ananias laid his hands on Saul not only was he able to see once more but he was filled with the Holy Spirit. Father we thank you that with the powerful help of the Holy Spirit Saul went on to do many, many wonderful things for you. 

Thank you Father God that just as the Holy Spirit changed Saul in an amazing way he is able to work in our lives too, comforting, guiding and changing us from the inside out. Thank you that with the powerful help of the Holy Spirit all Christians everywhere are able to learn and grow to live the way you created them to live. Father we understand that although we may never do the amazing things Saul did you have wonderful plans for each of our lives and you love us more than we could ever imagine.  Amen.

With younger children, or during a shorter session you may wish to select just one or two phrases from the reflective prayer.

 

 

344 - Craft planner

 

Shiny bunting

 
 
IMG_20170227_132348768.jpg
 
 

You will need:
Bunting flag template (see Printables)
kitchen foil
String cut into 40 cm lengths
String cut into 10 cm lengths
Hole reinforcement stickers
Glue sticks
Small scraps of felt, a yellow duster or other soft fabric cut into small pieces

How to prepare:
Print one or two templates. Use the templates to cut out sufficient bunting flag shapes from the kitchen foil for one or two per child. Make a bunting flag so that the children know what they are making. 

 

How to make shiny bunting:

 
 
 
 

1. Draw around the template and cut out a bunting flag from a sheet of kitchen foil. Fold the flag in half. Open out the flag and place a 30 cm piece of string in the fold.
2. Arrange pieces of string and stickers in a pattern on the bottom half of the flag.    
3. Spread a thin layer of glue on the top half of the flag.
4. Fold the top and bottom halves of the flag together. Gently rub the small piece of cloth across the foil until you can clearly see the raised pattern beneath.
5. Collect together the flags made in your group. Tie the pieces of string together to make a length of shiny bunting. 
6. If you have time make a second flag and add it to the bunting. Hang the bunting somewhere in your church building where it will reflect the sunlight.

Remind the children that light flashed around Saul on the road to Damascus.

 


 

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345_A changed man (Upside-down frown)

 
 
 
30 mins.png
 

345_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 9
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 391

Notes
You could talk to the children a little bit about the city of Damascus. Explain that it is a very, very old city. Show the children where it is first mentioned in the Bible by looking at Genesis 15:2.

 

Setting the scene and a starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one to four

Question:  How would you find your way around a busy city?  Would you use a map… or maybe a Sat Nav? Perhaps you would ask someone for directions: ‘Turn right, turn left, turn right again, then straight on until you reach the corner’.  But how would you find your way around busy city if you couldn’t see where you were going?

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A map of the Holy Land at the time of Jesus with Jerusalem and Damascus clearly marked.
  • Pictures from the internet of Straight Street in Damascus – make sure you comply with copyright regulations. 
  • An empty plate and cup
  • ‘Go to Straight Street’ speech bubble (see Printables) 
  • ‘He has become my servant’ speech bubbles (see Printables)
  • Tissue paper cut into two circles approximately the size of a contact lens  –  to represent fish-  scales 
  • A basket (Use any sized basket, but explain that the basket Saul escaped in would have been large and used for carrying heavy things)

 

 
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy colouring in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_ A guided assault course
You will need: Lots of cardboard boxes or chairs and something to cover a child’s eyes such as a scarf or eye mask. 

1. Set up an ‘assault course’ in your teaching area using chairs or cardboard boxes. If you have enough boxes stack them on top of each other to make small towers.
2. Ask for two volunteers. Encourage the volunteers to choose which of them will be blindfolded and who will be the guide.
3. Allow the person to be blindfolded, to either carefully tie the scarf around their eyes or to position the eye mask so they cannot see.
4. The guide should then take the arm of the blindfolded person and lead them through the assault course.  Each guide should start with five points. Every time the blindfolded person accidentally touches a chair or box the guide should lose a point.
5. Once the blindfolded person has successfully manoeuvred through the assault course a second pair should be allowed to take a turn.

 

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God we imagine the Christians‘ concern when they heard that Saul was coming to arrest them. We imagine men and women waiting in Damascus for the guards to arrive. 

Father we thank you that by the time Saul reached the city he was a changed man. Thank you that through your love and forgiveness and the powerful help of the Holy Spirit, Saul changed from a man that wanted to hurt the followers of Jesus to becoming a follower himself. 

Thank you Father God that, in the same way Saul turned from his old way of living and began a life of trusting you, we too can say ‘Yes’ to your love and forgiveness and with the help of the Holy Spirit, learn and grow to live the way you created us to live. Amen.

With younger children, or during a shorter session you may wish to select just one or two phrases from the reflective prayer.

 

 

344_Craft planner

 

Upside-down frown

 
 
IMG_20180307_164909744.jpg
 
 

You will need:
Face templates (see Printables)
Body templates (see Printables)
Scissors
Sticky tape
Coloured felt
Black, brown or yellow wool
Colouring pencils
A clothes peg
Woollen gloves
Paper plates
Glue stick

How to prepare:
Print or photocopy sufficient head, body and nose templates. For younger children you may want to cut out the templates before the session. Make a sample puppet so that the children know what they are making.

 

How to make a puppet with an upside-down frown:

 
 
 
 


1. Colour in and carefully stick your head template to the middle of your paper plate.
2. Cut around your template and cut out a small strip 8 x 2 cm from the paper plate.      
3. Cut the wool into three or four strands approximately 6 cm in length.     
4. Use the nose template to cut out a ‘nose’ from the coloured felt. Stick the nose to the face, tucking the strips of wool underneath to make a pair of eyebrows/moustache.
5. Turn the face over and lay the strip on the back. Bend the strip slightly then secure the two ends with sticky tape. You should now have a small ‘handle’ on the back of the face.
6. Put on a woollen glove and slide your index and middle fingers through the handle. Your face will either have a frown or a smile – turn the face upside-down to change its expression.
7. To make a body for your puppet colour in and fold the template along the dotted lines so that the dots are on the outside of the folds. Stand ‘the body’ upright. Clip a clothes peg to the top of the body template. 
8.  Slide the ‘handle’ on the back of the face over the peg as shown in the picture. Turn he frown upside-down. 
 

 


 

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350_The God's have come to Earth

 
 
 
30 mins.png
 

350_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 13-14
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 396

Notes:
Zeus’ and ‘Hermes’ were the names of two gods worshipped by the Greek people. Both Paul and Barnabas believed in One God. They believed that God was three in One; One God, three Persons or parts: God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit. They believed that Jesus was God the Son. When the man was healed by the power of the Holy Spirit, Paul and Barnabas wanted God to be praised. They would have been horrified to discover that people thought they were actually gods.

 

Setting the scene and Starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one to six . 

Question: Have you ever given someone a bunch of flowers, perhaps your mum or your grandma? One day, the apostle Paul was given a garland of flowers. A garland is a long line of flowers threaded onto a piece of string. Sometimes a garland is tied into a loop and placed around a person’s neck – it shows that a person is important or special. Do you think Paul was pleased to receive a garland of flowers?

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A bunch of flowers
  • A map showing Paul’s first missionary trip
  • A globe or map of the world
  • Two signs, one saying Zeus and Hermes  (see Printables)
  • A cheap garland of plastic flowers or bunched-up tissue paper stuck to a long loop of string.
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_A string of flowers
You will need: Flower pictures for colouring in (see Printables), wax crayons or pastel crayons, a long piece of string and clothes pegs.

1. Before the session hang the string up like a washing-line across your teaching area.
2. Just before you tell the story encourage the children to colour in the flower pictures.
3. Peg the flowers to the ‘washing-line’.
4. As you tell the story refer to the flowers as you talk about the garlands presented to Paul and Barnabas.

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God, we thank you for all the people who take your good news around the world today.  

We thank you that in thousands of cities, towns and villages there are people passing on the wonderful news that Jesus lived, died and rose again so that everybody everywhere can be close friends with you.

Father we ask that you keep these people safe as they travel from place to place. Father keep them safe as they travel across the oceans and countryside in the way Paul and Barnabas did.   Amen.

 

350_Craft planner

 

Crafting a compass

 
 
COMPASS1.jpg
 
 

You will need:
Paper case template (see Printables)
Paper compass template (see Printables)
Plain A5 card – optional
Scissors
Sticky tape
Colouring pencils
Glue stick

Making the compass is a group activity so you will need one each of the following items:
A strong magnet
A metal sewing needle or metal paper clip
A small plastic bowl
A polystyrene cup
A cork
A jug of water

 

How to prepare:
Print or photocopy sufficient paper compass templates for one per child. For younger children you may want to cut out the templates before the session. Before the session make a sample paper compass so that the children know what they are making.

 
 
 

Crafting a compass:

 
 
 
 

The step marked with an ‘*’ should be carried out by an adult.

1. To prepare your paper compass, cut out and colour in your templates. Fold the paper case in half. If you have pieces of A5 card stick the paper case to the card before folding it in half. Stick your ‘compass’ inside the case.  

2. To construct a compass,  Unfold the paperclip so that you have a straight piece of metal. Fill a plastic bowl with water. If you have a small bowl only partially unfold the paperclip. 
3. *Cut the bottom out of a polystyrene cup or, if using a cork, cut a slice off the end.     
4. Hold the unfolded paperclip flat on a table. Rub the end of the magnet along the length of the paperclip repeatedly in one direction. This will magnetise the paperclip.
5. To make sure your paperclip is magnetised place a second paperclip close to the tip of the first paperclip.  If the paperclip is not attracted, return to Step 4.
6.  Float the polystyrene disc or cork on the water in the small bowl. Carefully place the     needle or paperclip on the disc.
7. Allow the compass needle to settle. The direction the needle is pointing is magnetic north. 
8. Use the constructed compass to position your paper compass so it is pointing to magnetic north. Now work out the direction of south, east and west.  

Use the constructed compass to help the children position their paper compasses so they are pointing to magnetic north. Describe how travellers use a compass to work out the direction in which they need to travel. Talk about Paul travelling from place to place to tell people the good news about Jesus. 


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355 & 356_Paul is arrested & The secret plot

 
 
 
30 mins.png
 

355 & 356_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 21-23
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 401-403
‘Paul is arrested’ see Printables

 

Setting the scene and Starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one to nine . 

Question: Have you ever thought that people’s lives are like stories? In a story all sorts of wonderful things happen and in people’s lives different and exciting things happen too. If you think about it, no one person’s life story is the same; everybody meets different people and does different things - that’s one of the things that makes us special.

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A toy Roman helmet
  • A small piece of rope
  • A picture of Saul on the road to Damascus from a children’s picture Bible
  • A coat
  • A small tray of play sand
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_Listen to someone tell their story
Invite somebody from your church congregation to very briefly tell their ‘story’ about becoming a Christian. Make sure your arrangements for having a visitor in your setting comply with your church’s Safeguarding Policies and Procedures.

Tell the Bible story using the props listed above then encourage your visitor to speak for around five minutes. Your visitor may prefer to be interviewed by you or a helper. When the visitor has told their story ask the children if they would like to ask any questions. 

 

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  
Father God, we imagine the angry crowds rushing towards Paul. We remember they were frustrated that Paul was not living the way they thought he should live. They were cross that people who were not Jewish were in their Temple. 

Father we think about Paul being led away followed by the angry crowd. We imagine Paul being pushed and shoved. Father we remember that Paul did not reply with angry words or push back the people trying to hurt him. Instead he stood up and told his story. He told the crowd about God speaking to him on the way to the city of Damascus and the work of the Holy Spirit in his life.

Father we thank You for Paul's example, how even when he was being treated badly he still wanted to tell the people around him the good news about Jesus. Father we ask that You help us to tell others about Your Son. Father we ask that the Holy Spirit works powerfully in our lives guiding and changing us from the inside out, so that we long to share with our friends and family what we know about You.   Amen.

With younger children, or during a shorter session you may wish to select just one or two phrases from the reflective prayer.

 

355 & 356_Craft planner

 

My Story bookmark

 
 
IMG_20170227_112358576.jpg
 
 

You will need:
Luggage labels
‘My story’ textboxes (see Printables)
Felt-tip pens
Scissors
Glue, glue pots and brushes
Beads of various shapes, colours and sizes*

*If threading beads is not a suitable activity for the younger children in your group, replace the beads with 20 cm lengths of coloured wool. Use a hole punch to punch holes along the edges of the luggage labels and encourage the children to thread the different coloured wool through the holes. 

How to prepare:
Print or photocopy sufficient ‘My Story' textboxes for one per child. Make a sample bookmark so the children can see what they are going to make. 

 
 
 

How to make a story bookmark:

 
 
 
 

1. Make sure the string is attached securely to your luggage label and has two free ends. Make one of the ends longer than the other. This will involve retying the  string. 
2. Colour in the textbox and stick it to your luggage label.
3.Try and think of five or six things that have happened in your life that you would like to be a part of your story bookmark. These things might include a special birthday, the day you got a pet or the day you started school. They could be big things or little memories. For each of these things find a bead that matches what you remember about that day or feeling. If you got a brown dog you might select a brown bead or a yellow bead might remind you of a really happy day.
4. When you have your beads, try and put them in the order that the things happened in your life. 
5. Carefully thread the beads one-by-one onto the string of your luggage label. Tie the ends of the string together so that the beads are secure.


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357& 358_Shipwreck! & Safe Ashore!

 
 
 
30 mins.png
 

357 & 358_Story planner

Reference 
Acts 24-28
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 403-405
‘Paul, the island and the snake’ see Printables

 

Setting the scene and Starter question_3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one to nine . 

Question: Have you ever got cold and wet on a rainy day? Have you stood outside until rain seeped through your clothes and dripped off the end of your cold nose? 

 

Tell the story with props_4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A map of Paul’s journey to Rome (You could use FlashCard number eight of the Early Church set)
  • A toy boat 
  • A bundle of sticks
  • ‘How to make a tie snake’ instructions and template (see Printables)
 

Story Activity_6 mins
Option 1_Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2_A game of ‘Snakes and Rope’
You will need: a dice, masking tape, three or four old ties, kitchen tissue paper, snake tongue and eyes (see Printables), PVA glue, pots and brushes three or four pieces of cord cut to various lengths (between 10 cm and 50 cm), ‘How to set up and play a game of Snakes and Ropes’ instructions (see Printables), enough counters for one per team (you could use plastic plates or up-turned cups) and ‘a list of questions’ (see Printables).

 

 
IMG_20170224_162817605.jpg
 

1.  Make three or four  tie snakes by stuffing kitchen tissue paper inside the ties. Stick two eyes and a tongue to the wide end of the stuffed tie.
2. Tell the story using the props then play a game of Snakes and Ropes. 

Option 3_ If you have a ‘Healing on the Streets’ ministry in your area you could ask somebody from the team to come and talk to the children about their experiences of praying for people. Relate their experience back to Paul praying for people on the island. Make sure you comply with your church’s Policies and Procedures when inviting guests to speak to the children. 

 

 

Reflective prayer_2 mins  

Father God, we imagine the terrible storm that tossed the ship to and fro. We imagine the travellers' great relief as they crawled onto the shore of the island. Father we thank You that You looked after all those aboard that boat. 

Father we remember the great kindness of the islanders who welcomed the travellers. Father help us to be kind and generous to those who we see are in trouble. Thank You that as the islanders helped the travellers they too were helped. We remember that Paul was able to tell them the great news of Jesus and then pray for all those who were unwell.  

Father we think about Paul's travelling companions; we imagine not only their great relief but their amazement at seeing Paul unharmed by the snake. Thank You that as Your Holy Spirit works in and through the lives of Christians, people close by get to see You at work. Amen

With younger children, or during a shorter session you may wish to select just one or two phrases from the reflective prayer.

 

357 & 358_Craft planner

 

A snake sandwich

 
 
IMG_20170227_1457414912.jpg
 
 

Beware of allergies – make sure it is safe for the children in your group to taste and handle the food used in this activity.

You will need:
A French baguette
Dinner knives
Sandwich fillings: cheese, ham, cucumber, tomato, mayonnaise, salami, cheese spread, lettuce.
A large board or baking tray (if you have neither use baking foil)
A bread knife*
Olives or grapes
Red and yellow peppers cut into thin slices

*Make sure all sharp knives are placed out of the children's reach during the session.

How to prepare:
Before the session clean the surfaces in your teaching area and cut the French baguette in half length ways. 

How to make a snake sandwich:
1. Encourage the children to wash their hands.
2. Working together place a variety of sandwich fillers on the bottom half of the cut French baguette.
3. Close the sandwich by placing the top half on top of the fillers. 
4. At one end of the giant sandwich place two olive slices for eyes. (Use grapes if you prefer.)
5. Make a ‘forked tongue’ out of a slice of red pepper and place it at the head end of the snake.
6. Decorate the snake’s back with thin slices of pepper.

 

An alternative edible snake

 
IMG_20170227_153720376.jpg
 

Beware of allergies – make sure it is safe for the children in your group to taste and handle the food used in this activity.

You will need: 
Individual brioche rolls*
Water icing - made from icing sugar and water mixed to a spreadable consistency (add the water slowly to avoid making the icing too runny)  
Cake sprinkles and small sweets for decorating
Two larger sweets and raisins for the snake's eyes
A short length of strawberry shoe lace for the snake's tongue
A large board or baking tray (if you have neither use baking foil)
Dinner knives

*for a dairy-free, gluten-free alternative use specially prepared bread rolls


How to prepare: 
Clean the surfaces in your teaching area.


How to make an edible snake: 
1.     Encourage the children to wash their hands.
2.     Give each child a roll. Encourage the children to cover their roll with water icing. 
3.      On the board or baking tray, place all the rolls end-to-end to look like a snake's body.
4.     Help the children to decorate the snake with sprinkles and small sweets.
5.    Position the two larger sweets and strawberry shoe lace at one end of the snake to look like it's eyes and tongue.

 


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364 - Letters from Peter

 
 

15 minute Story Planner

Reference 
1 Peter
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor page 411
‘Peter’s first letter’ (see Printables)

 

Setting the scene and Starter question - 3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one to ten . 

Question: Have you ever had a really bad day when nothing seemed to go right? Have you ever felt like going back to bed and starting the day all over again?

 

Tell the story with props - 4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A map showing the areas of Galatia and Cappadocia at the time of the Early Church. (The maps in the back of some Bibles may be useful.)
  • Speech bubbles (see Printables)
  • A Bible
 

Story Activity - 6 mins
Option 1 - Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2 - Taking a closer look at what Peter said
You will need the props listed above plus twenty small stones, double-sided sticky tape and a hula-hoop. 
1. Before the session print and cut out the speech bubbles.
2. Attach the bubbles to the small stones using sticky tape.
3. Place the hula-hoop on the floor and as you tell the story place the relevant stone inside the hoop.
4. You could give each child one or two stones at the beginning of the session. When you read out what is written on their stone ask them to gently place it inside the hoop

 

Reflective prayer - 2 mins  
Father God, we thank You for all the wonderful letters we have in our Bibles. Thank You that although people wrote the words down, You guided the writers and showed them what to write. Thank You that each of the Bible letters are a very special work of Your Holy Spirit and they say what You want them to say. Father we think particularly about Peter's letters. We remember that the Apostle Peter wanted to encourage the Christians who were being treated badly and were finding it difficult to keep on living God's way. 

Father we thank You that these words are still encouraging for us today as we too know that living Your way is not always easy. Father we remember Peter's words: ‘If somebody does something mean to you do something kind back’. Father we ask that You help us this week to live the way Peter encourages us to live, and respond with kindness and love even when others are unkind to us. Amen

 

15 minute Craft Planner

 

See-through glasses

 
 
IMG_20170226_124435233.jpg
 
 

You will need:
Glasses template (see Printables)
A4 card that fits through your printer (plain A4 paper would work too)
Acetate or plastic A4 folders
Colouring pencils and/or felt-tip pens
Scissors
Sticky tape
Glue sticks

How to prepare:
Print sufficient templates for one per child. Cut out the glasses in advance and cut out the ‘lenses’ from the acetate or plastic folders. Follow the instructions to make an example pair of glasses so that the children know what they are about to make.

 
 
 

How to make see-through glasses:

 
 
 
 

1. Colour in the glasses template and carefully cut out the glasses. 
2. Cut out the two rectangles below the glasses template. Place the two rectangles on top of the plastic A4 folder/acetate. Use a pen to carefully draw around both pieces.  It doesn't matter if the lines are faint.
3. Cut out the plastic rectangles.    
4. Fold along the dotted line down the centre of the ‘glasses frame’. 
5. Use sticky tape to stick the arms to the frame of the glasses as shown in the picture.
6. Apply lots of glue to the inside of the glasses frame. Stick the two pieces of plastic  over the holes and fold the two halves of the frame together. You may need to trim any plastic overlapping the edge.
7&8. Press the two halves of the frame firmly together. 


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365 - A glimpse into Heaven

 
 
 

15 minute Story Planner 

Reference 
Revelation
The Children’s Bible in 365 Stories by Mary Batchelor pages 412-413
‘A throne and a rainbow’ (see Printables)

 

Setting the scene and Starter question - 3 mins 
Find the New Testament section in a Bible.
Show and talk about ‘The Early Church FlashCards’ cards one to ten . 

Question: What do you think thrones are made of? Wood, gold, precious stones? Thrones can be made out of all sorts of materials. The Queen of Great Britain has a throne made of wood and another covered in gold. The Bible describes King Solomon’s throne as so big that it had steps going up to it. 

 

Tell the story with props - 4 mins
Click on the images at the beginning of this post to download more web resources

  • A picture of a royal throne and a rainbow (From a library book or the internet; beware of copyright restrictions)
  • A map showing the island of Patmos 
  • A rolled-up scroll
  • A candle-stick holder
  • A mirror to represent the ‘sea of glass’
  • A Bible
 

Story Activities - 6 mins
Option 1 - Enjoy the puzzles in this weeks Dead Sea Comic Caper (see Printables)

Option 2 - Make a picture display
You will need: ‘The throne in Heaven’ pictures (see Printables), a pair of scissors and an old envelope. 

1. Before the session cut out the pictures and place them in the envelope.
2. During the session sit the children on the floor in a circle.
3. As you tell the story place the pictures on the floor, adding each picture at the relevant point of the story.

Option 3 - A rhyme with actions
1.Tell the story using props.
2. Briefly explain that the creatures around the throne never stop saying: ‘Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God Almighty, Who was and is, and is to come’. When they call out, the twenty-four leaders fall down and worship the King.
3. Teach the children the following rhyme. Ask them to help you make up some actions.
4. Say the rhyme a number of times trying to be as dramatic as possible – you could give each child an instrument encouraging them to play along sensitively.  

From the throne lightening flashes,
A rainbow glistens and thunder crashes.

A shimmering sea, flowing in heaven,
Lamp-stands one to seven.

Twenty-four elders each with a crown,
Creatures call out and the leaders fall down.

 

Reflective prayer - 2 mins  
Father God we think of the vision John had on the island of Patmos. Thank You that through this vision we can begin to imagine how wonderful the Kingdom of Heaven is. 

Father we remember that there were many new things John saw. We thank You that even though there is so much we do not yet understand we can trust You that Heaven is a wonderful, wonderful place. 

Father God we remember Your amazing promise that we will one day live in Heaven with You. Thank You that You have prepared a place for each of us in Your wonderful Heavenly Kingdom. Amen

 

15 minute Craft Planner

 

Rainbow science

 
 
IMG_20170301_145934574.jpg
 
 

Beware of allergies – make sure it is safe for the children in your group to handle the food used in this activity.
 

1. Rainbow milk

You will need: 
Red, blue and yellow food colouring
1 cup of whole (full fat) milk
Washing -up liquid
A small bowl
A shallow round dish
A cotton bud

What to do:
1. Pour enough milk into the dish to just cover the bottom.
2.  Add a drop of each type of food colouring. Try and space the colours out, although it  doesn't matter if they begin to spread into each other.
3. Squeeze a drop of washing-up liquid into the separate small bowl.     
4.    Dip the cotton bud into the washing-up liquid then use it to touch one of the blobs of     food colouring in the milk. 

 What happens to the colours?

 

2. A watery rainbow

You will need: 
A clear drinking glass
A jug of water
2 sheets of white paper
A chair
A torch 

What to do:
1.     Fill the glass a little more than half-way with water.
2.     Place both sheets of paper on the floor at the base of the chair.
3.     Carefully place the glass on the edge of the chair.  
4.    Shine the torch through the glass onto the paper on the floor.
5.    Keep moving the torch until you see a rainbow appear on the paper below.

 

3. A shiny rainbow

You will need: 
An old CD
A sheet of white paper 

What to do:
1. Find a rainbow on the surface of a CD.
2. Try and reflect the rainbow onto the piece of paper. 

 

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